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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 137 (some duplicates have been removed)
they are at a disadvantage, i completely agree with kleiza rice that the civil rights issue of our day is school choice and the disaster of the public schools, it is a universal law of nature that everything run by the government will become worse and more expensive over time. everything that is sold on the private market will become better and less expensive over time. like flat screen tv's, cell phones. versus the post office, public schools, and amtrak food service. and by the way, our entire health care is now going to be put in the hands -- in the capable hands of the federal government. >> one more school thing. also from "the new york times." >> i disagree. >> you may not. four decades after clashes, bottom of the again debates school busing. nearly four decades after the city was convulsed by violence over court-ordered segregation, boston is working to reduce its reliance on busing at a school system now made up of largely minority students. although court-ordered busing ended more than two decades ago, only 13% of students in boston, 13% in the public schools, today are white. and the school
. when the civil rights movement happened, they shifted. i remember discussions in the 1980's and 1990's. the latino community, to be appealed to on issues like small government and family values, and they wrote off that possibility, quite frankly, with racism, seeing every brown person, every latino, as an illegal. they have done the same thing with the asian community. they used to be very republican. coming from hostile countries -- they have been driven into the democratic party with subtle and not so subtle racial appeals. i think they believe if they can do what they did in 2010, they can turn out their older white bass, and they can hold onto power, and they can -- they can turn out their older what it -- white base -- it is not a permanent strategy, but it can keep them in power for a while. and it is ugly. tavis: the new book from joan walsh is "what's the matter with white people?: why we long for a golden age that never was." she tells a wonderful story about her family and their presence. i have only scratched the surface, so you may want to pick it up. joan, thank you. >> th
against violence and rape, for equal pay and educational opportunities. on behalf of civil rights and women's rights. we've shown a bright light on women's rights from the powerful economic interest that profit at women's expense to the relishes fundamentalist. in the fall issue of "ms.," we celebrate these 40 years of impactful reporting. from the very first issue, with the abortion petition signed by 53 prominent women who had abortions when they were illegal to repeal our abortion laws. nearly 15 years before anita hill's fame mouse testimony. to our ground beaking reporting that defined genital mutilation as an international crime against women. to our 1996 look inside the taliban's regime before most of the media had even noticed right up to our 2011 story declaring rape is rape in which we revealed the f.b.i.'s 80-year-old definition of rape under counted rapes in this country by hundreds of thousands every year. that was part of a larger feminist campaign and kicked off a fire storm resulting in 140,000 e-mails and letters to the f.b.i. and attorney general demanding the de
of republicans pushing civil rights legislation, antipole tax legislation, anti-link legislation. public accommodations legislation with the democrats constantly blocking, blocking, blocking and the tricks they use these were liberal democrats. they weren't conservative democrats. you just become so frustrated that i think nixon was absolutely right. you can hear the frustration in the speeches he gave about it he said the building trades have been given long enough to -- to -- to voluntarily integrate their work forces. if they're going -- i've had it now. if they refuse to hire black people, we're going to get results now. so i supported it back then i think he was right. >> let me just add one other person's thought on affirmative action and get your response and then we'll start taking calls. this is a piece in the "new york times" this morning by a gentleman by the name of thomas eppenshade. no longer separate equal race in college, an elite college admission and college life he's the professor in [ indiscernible ] he believes affirmative action is beneficial but doesn't believe the
and civil rights leader, clarence mitchell iii, details on the death and one of the state's most prominent political families. game four of the alds. we hope the o's can pull out a win. now your maryland lottery midday numbers. >> ♪ the maryland lottery, let yourself play ♪ >> go o's. et's go to your pick three game. 5. 3. final numbers, 3. 5, 3, 3. we will get to your pick four in a moment. the latest ravens fan is katie from laurel, delaware. she won $6,000. find out how you can become a fan of the game. all set and ready to go with your four numbers. 0. 3. 0. last number, 9. 0, 3, 0, 9. the maryland lottery, let yourself play. >> thank you so much for joining us for 11 news at noon. we want to remind you to watch tonight. [captioning made possible by barnhill: you hear a lot of talk about question seven... so let me tell you what i know: if question seven passes, my company's going to... bring table games, like blackjack and poker... right here to baltimore. a twenty-five million dollar investment... that'll create five hundred new jobs. all right here. today, marylanders are spendi
like you also thought the civil rights movement for african-americans took the opportunity of the franchise to run for office. if you don't like those laws, you become a lawmaker. >> become part of the solution. i think that's -- i want to just say about president obama, he's one of the reasons that people are so mobilized by himment you can identify with him on multiple levels. i like to think of president obama as an immigrant. certainly a child of an immigrant. there are multiple levels at which you can identify with that and it gave people his election also mobilized a lot of different folks to feel that something was possible. >> certainly a cosmopolitan citizen having lived in schools, indonesia, a half sister who was indonesian. as well as american like. that idea of a cosmopolitan person is part what the immigrant story is. grace, i wish you great luck in your campaign. thank you, sayu, robert and chloe are back for me. next we're talking about affirmative action. jack, you're a little boring. boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the cit
, history of labor in the 20th century, one of the great triumphs of the civil rights era was for people to recognize -- for white labor to recognize that as long as black laborers were excluded from unions they were undercutting white labor as well. >> it took a while. >> it did. it took 60 years actually. so when you see this kind of cynical advertising, they're trying to use that same ploy using african-americans. and if we had any doubt about the inter-related struggles, let's look at this one issue. how many times have we seen politicians get into trouble because they had nannies who were not being paid or being paid under the tashlgs being exploited. if we look back, we don't have to go to hollywood, we don't -- >> go home. >> look back to the history. half a century ago, that exploited domestic labor would have been black women. >> that's right. >> these are the same struggles. >> absolutely. i so appreciate that. that's part of why next i get to talk about the smartest thing i have read about black folks and the presidency of president obama in four years. we're going to talk abo
important civil rights cases to come before them in years. affirmative action for college admissions. we are going to break that down and much more after this. >>> former model olga created. she knows contents sells. she also launched a companion online magazine as an opening source important what's in. for more of "your business," sunday mornings, 7:30 on msnbc. i'm only in my 60's... i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. call now to request your free decision guide. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him. you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare pa
to ut. >> reporter: conservative groups say it's not just about getting in. the u.s. civil rights commission says studies show that using racial preferences can hurt minorities by starting them out near the bottom of their classes. >> if they're towards the bottom of whatever class they go to, they are much more likely to give up on an ambitiono major in science and engineering. >> almost a decade ago, then justice sandra day o'connor wrote a majority opinion that said that the university of michigan law school had a compelling interest in promoting class diversity and suggested affirmative action might still be needed for another 25 years. o'connor has since left the court, leading to speculation that the court's conservatives could now strike a blow to preferences. joe johns, cnn, washington. >> thank you, joe johns. so jeff toobin, this is the question. does this texas case raise any new and diinctive questions about this, about affirmative action, or is this one of those second bites at the apple, merely another opportunity for a different supreme court with brand-new justices
. >>> president obama's in california attending fund-raisers and honoring the late labor and civil rights actist cesar chavez. our white house correspondent dan lothian is traveling with the president right now. what's the latest areaction coming from the obama campaign? >> reporter: first of all, the president himself has not reacted to that speech by mitt romney. but last night at a major fund-raiser in los angeles, he was flexing his foreign policy muscles right off the top of his remarks, he was talking about how he ended the war in iraq, how he's winding down the war in afghanistan, how he's gone after terrorists, how he got osama bin laden. those are just some examples, says his campaign, of strong leadership. as president obama honored civil rights icon cesar chavez -- >> the movement he helped to lead was sustained by a generation of organizers who stood up and spoke out and urged others to do the same. >> reporter: his campaign worked to shred gop nominee mitt romney's foreign policy chops, rolling out this hard-hitting web ad reminding voters of what they called stumbles on the world s
of civil rights, when first elected, he was one of the nation's youngest legislators. his son was also a delicate and is now a radio host here at wbal. >> i celebrate the great live that my father lived. the story he presented to all of us who are beneficiaries of his public policy initiative. >> his nephew says his uncle was a man like no other. he taught him about politics. >> he taught us what it meant to campaign, let's just say. he taught us how to knock on doors. he taught us to be close to people peeping he taught us about organization. you cannot just go out there and put your name on the ballot and expect people to votes. he said you always have to stay close to the people. he was the consummate politician and the consummate campaigner. >> but there were hard times. he served 16 months in federal prison after being convicted in 1987 of influence peddling. >> he had a smile on his face. he was just stronger. you know, they are not going to beat me down. he refused to let people beat him down. and even up into his passing, he was fighting. i saw him last week. >> no one's life i
on a engagement tour with my civil rights organization, national action network. we're making sure that everyone gets their voice heard in 28 days. but the right wing is trying to scare voters away. look at this bulletin board. it's popping up in minority neighborhoods in milwaukie, wisconsin. with the big headline -- voter fraud is a felony. three years in prison $10,000 fine. and the woman on the right telling us -- we voted illegally. >>> in ohio this billboard is in a black neighborhood around cleveland. they went up last week just as early voting started. voting fraud is a felony 3 1/2 years, $10,000 fine. a private family foundation is reportedly behind them. what that means is a mystery. we tried to find out who they are. so far they haven't responded to our requests. city councilwoman fill is cleveland is determined to get answers. >> this is clearly an attempt at voter intimidation. i want to find out who this foundation is who paid for it, number one. they need to show their hand as well. you can't send intimidating messages to people. >> they're do
's against your civil rights. i don't want to get the flu shot. and to me it seems like i'm being forced into putting a virus in my body that i object to. >> we need to have a workforce available when the public needs fit they are sick and people choose to work in a hospital. >> if workers have a medical condition that prevents them from getting the shot they have to wear a mask. >>> the unemployment rate fell in september. more people returned to the labor force and hiring was steady. in this week's smart is the new rich meet one guy who took a big risk to make a career change in a brightening job market. here's christine romans. >> reporter: he wanted to switch careers from operations in i.t. to marketing and big data. in a slow jobs market that takes training and risk. >> i decided to go back to business school and i went part time and realized that i needed even more training so i left my full time position and gained internship at cbs. and that was a great gateway. so the internship plus the mba, i was able to fortunately land at met life. looking at the data more on the marketing
of violating their civil rights by coercing their confessions. the city has defended 9 way it's conducted its investigation. the filmmaker refuse to share outtakes citing shield laws. >> we believe we are protected under the shield laws as journalists and we don't think it's fair for the government to intrude in our research. >> reporter: a lawyer for the city says the film isn't journalism because it advocates for the five. in a statement, the city says, quote, if the plaintiffs truly want an open airing of the facts, they should encourage the filmmakers not to hide anything. the filmmakers claim the documentary sticks to the facts. what do you make of the city trying to go after the outtakes for this film? >> the city needs to stop dragging their feet. i don't think they would find anything other than what they already know, that we were innocent and this is just going to continue to further restate that. >> reporter: yusef says no matter the outcome, he may never fully escape his nightmare that started in in park. susan candiotti, cnn, new york. >>> the world watches cape canaveral, florid
, okay he has the polls. today is a big day for many latinos and many civil rights and labor activists. the fact he dedicates this national monument on a day like today and the fact yes, we can can came from the united workers is a big deal, and it's a message to the latino community. >> each family has their own individuali issues. each person has factors that determine how engaged they are in the campaign, whether they can get out to vote and who they will vote for. generically speaking here, if you had to explain why there's this enthusiasm gap, if these numbers are accurate, what is the problem? >> i think you can look at it from what the gop has not done. i was speaking to a political scientist today who said in some states like nevada and colorado, the anti-immigrant rhetoric hurt in a year that they could have had more latino votes. the economy is not doing that well. >> i get when you look at arizona, why someone would be concerned and perhaps not support a jan brewer, given her actions in front of the mike and behind in her office when she signs legislation. i'm talking about
in differences of civil rights, a lot of those who lived through this week over town, the best thing that george bush is that he is not ronald reagan. >> largely as result of policies and priorities of the reagan administration, more people are becoming poorer and staying for than any time since world war ii. >> if there's anything left of ronald reagan's trickle-down theory, it seems to be anxiety which seems to be trickling down to just about every segment of our society. >> if you gave clarence thomas all little flower, you would think -- here is a man who is against everything that has lifted the level of life of millions of blacks. >> i hope his wife feeds him mustard eggs and butter and he dies like many black men, of heart disease. that so i feel. he is a reprehensible person. >> you call to gingrich in your words trickle down terrorists who face their agenda on division, exclusion and fear. you think middle-class americans need protection from that group? >> the new republican majority took a big step today on the legislative agenda, to demolish or damage government aid programs. many of
himself to the naacp in the civil rights era in which there were secret donations were allowed. but of course rove is not martin luther king jr. >> cenk: really? yeah to say the least. >> people were fascinated like king was fighting for equal rights and rove and billionaires are fighting for tax breaks. not quite the same. >> cenk: it doesn't matter if you break the laws as the bush administration did because president obama looks forward he doesn't look backwards. he's going let you get away with anything anyway, he's encouraged by that, if you ask me. carl unger, thank you for "boss rove"." >> thank for having me, cenk. >> cenk: someone is not taking what the republicans are dishing out. the family of a navy seal who was actually killed in libya strikes back. >> one was a former navy seal, and glen doherty and you can imagine how shocked i was to learn that he was one of the two navy--former navy seals killed in bengahzi. >> cenk: wait until you see how shocked he is when his mom said, cut it out. i don't want you to talk about him any more. and then mark hamill. look at thi
and immigrants, whether it's civil rights, those things are on the line. and i just hope we don't see a repeat in the debate tomorrow night of the shame of that first debate where hispanics is and women and gay people and african-americans didn't even seem to exist in domestic policy. >> so, this is irreversible damage, for suburban women. would you agree with that, terry? >> oh, absolutely. i think suburban women are going -- are not going to vote for mitt romney. i think they see right through his deception. and i think that they actually, it's incredibly offensive and demeaning to women to treat us as if we're so stupid that we would believe this kind of hoaxerism. we're looking for a president that we can take at his word. barack obama is pro-choice and he means it when he says he's pro-choice. mitt romney will say anything and do anything and he is not the right president for women. >> i think all of us in our lifetime come across people who do business deals and they will say anything they possibly can to get the deal, close the deal at closing, and mitt romney comes off as one of these
interfaith and civil rights groups have reached out to metro. >> to ask the transit authority to respond in a positive way, not by censoring, but by working with the arab american and muslim community, promoting mutual understanding, perhaps through another ad campaign that would counter the hate message in this campaign. >> metro officials don't give away ad space anywhere, but if care or any other group wants to counter this message with one of their own and a space becomes available, they are free to do it. they have to pay for the ad. >> and where in my message does it say muslim? >> but cares hooper says it is certainly implied. >> if she wants to spew hatred, she is free to do so in america, but it's up to the rest of the society, the mainstream practitioners to come together to repudiate hatred and promote mutual understanding. >> those posters did not go public without a fight. metro wanted to hold off, but the ads had to go up now. it was concerned about public safety and adding fuel to the fires burning recently. so far, reaction here has been muted. brian. >> bob tonig
groups say it's not just about getting in. the u.s. civil rights commission says studies show that using racial preferences can hurt minorities by starting them out near the bottom of their classes. >> if they're towards the bottom of whatever class they go to, they are much more likely to give up on an ambition to major in science and engineering. >> joe johns is live outside of the supreme court for us. so joe, will this decision -- it probably will -- have implications on all college campuses? >> reporter: well, it certainly could. and you know, i have to say, this is such a hotly contested issue even now, and it has been over the years. just that last statement from the commissioner is disputed, you know. the academic mismatch, as it's called, is disputed among people on the other side who say it's unsound science. so just about every single point you look at across the board on the issue of affirmative action and preferences is disputed here in this courtroom right now. what does it come down to? perhaps a very even split. and we do know that justice elena kagan has recused herself.
and the other members of the eu have suspended habeas corpus, which have limited civil rights and human rights, which have participated in renditions and handing over european citizens to be tortured and other parts of the world or to be sent to guantanamo. so all of this brings very hollow. as for the absurd remark that the european union has united europe after the war? that is total nonsense. it did not exist after the war. were actually helped western europe, not eastern europe, which helped western europe after the second world war and had nothing to do with europe. it was the u.s., the marshall plan which allows money to build part of western europe as part of their contribution compared to the east, which was under soviet control. so why bring me eu in after the war? [indiscernible] to keep europe under some kind of control, and it is not working. european citizens in different parts of europe will be laughing at this decision. >> tariq ali, thank you for being with us, a british- pakistani political commentator, historian, activist, filmmaker, novelist, author of over 20 books includin
. >> affirmative action, civil rights group rally as the supreme court revisit also race can be a factor in college admissions. and won't you be my neighbor? late night's jimmy fallon visits mr. romney's neighborhood. >> it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood. beautiful day for a neighbor. would you be mine? could you be mine? hello, neighbor. you see this? it's called a wallet. inside of a wallet, oh, that's where money goes. now, do you know what money is? i'm guessing no, because you're watching public television. >> good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. the house republican hearings on last month's terrorist attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi are under way now on capitol hill. chairman darrell issa opened the hearings demanding answers from the state department about their response to the incident. as well as the amount of security personnel in place before september 11th. >> we know that the tragedy in benghazi ended as it did. we now know that, in fact, it was caused by a terrorist attack that wasp reasonably predictable to eventually happen somewhere in the world, especia
of african-americans born in the pre-civil rights rural south, that's a problem since many were delivered at home by midwives and recordkeeping was weak. the midwife who delivered raymond listed his first name as ramon and got his last name completely wrong, but his voter registration card has his correct name. >> do you vote? >> yes, i do. >> has this ever been a problem? >> voting? no, it hasn't been. >> reporter: but it could be now. rutherford says he can't get a photo id until he corrects his birth certificate, which requires an attorney he cannot afford. it is really difficult to get any kind of specific numbers as to how many voters could be impacted by the new south carolina law. according to the election commission, it could be anywhere from a high of 202,000 to a low of 51,000. >> i started looking at the numbers. i said, he is black, she's black, she's black, he -- i thought, god, this isracial. >> supporters of the new law says race has nothing to do with it. it's simply meant to protect against voter fraud, and there is a provision to allow voters like rutherford to cast a pr
, the diversity of texas, which had affirmative flee been discriminating -- not against black people in the civil-rights era -- was made to end a black student, sort of in the brown versus board of education era. not directly relevant to the case, but it casts a shadow, and reminds us, in living memory, the that the state's affirmative it discriminated against a disadvantaged minority in the most pernicious way. the question is, how we move forward it enough away from those days for their not to be some effort at the mediation and an effort to make sure all aspects of society are represented in our student bodies. host: who are the players in this case? guest: fisher is supported by a small group from the project of fair representation, which has in many settings, including voting rights, taking conservative positions. on the university of texas aside is an avalanche of friend-of- the-court briefs. there are some on the other side, but for that way by a friend-of-the-court briefs, supported the diversity, for all aspects of society, including corporations and military leaders to take the view that it is
: the civil rights struggles of the last two years mean absolutely nothing to you. this letter is so funny. >> yet so intelligent. >> yeah i try to juxtapose this idea that this is a logic call and reasoned argument, and at the same time i'm throwing some funny words in it. then you can go oh yeah, that is the letter that had sparkle pony in it. >> stephanie: you are blowing up a lot of stereo types, including the dumb jock, aren't you. [ laughter ] >> i have always tried to be a bit of a [ inaudible ]. >> stephanie: she i'll have to look that word up. your stance -- i can't pronounce him name >> imbidacio -- >> stephanie: there you go. are going to have real important consequences. >> yeah, and i think one of the things to remember is -- especially for minnesota even if we defeat the amendment here it still won't make gay marriage legal. and hopefully we can get that changed at a future point, but we're fighting for our children to be able to make have their own voice. >> stephanie: you say it so well in here. somebody canned you how do you want to start talking about.
are the stakes here? >> the stakes are tremendous. >> reporter: more than 70 groups from civil rights organizations to former military leaders to some of the largest corporations in the country have all asked the court to maintain some use of race in admissions. warning the loss of diversity would harm business, the training of military leaders and the quality of education. >> all students would suffer, not just black and latino students. all students benefit from learning together inside the classroom and out. >> reporter: they've expressed the concern over the use of racial preferences, meaning affirmative action is very much on the line here today. the last time the court reviewed this, just as sandra day o'connor speculated, that race preferences might not be needed after 25 years. the court took this case for review just nine years after she said that. >> wyatt andrews at the supreme court. in a few minutes we'll ask texas governor rick perry about the supreme court case right here on "cbs this morning." >>> the captain of the italian cruise liner who ran aground and capsized has
: more than 70 groups from civil rights organizations to former military leaders to some of the largest corporations in the country have all asked the court to maintain some use of race in admissions, warning that the loss of diversity would harm business, the training of military leaders, and the quality of education. >> all students would suffer not just black and latino students all students benefit from learning together in the classroom and outside of the classroom. >> reporter: all the courts conservative justices expressed concern over the use of racial prejudice, affirmative action is on the line. the last time the court reviewed this, justice sandra day o'connor speculated race may not be needed after 25 years. >> thanks. in just a few minutes we'll ask texas governor rick perry about the supreme court case right here on cbs "this morning." >> the kacht that italian cruise liner that ran around and capsized has been fired. reports say francesco schettino was let go in july for disregarding company policy. he says the charges are unfound and he wants to be reinstated with back p
's 7:17 right now. back to savannah, al and matt. where is the civility? >> our democracy at work. and they are in the same party, right? >> exactly the thriller in manila though. >> exactly. >> you want a piece of this? come on. >> mr. roker, what's going on? >> i'm doing okay. let's see how the rest of us are doing weather-wise. we've got a risk of severe storms stretching from dallas all the way to chicago and minneapolis. threat of damaging winds. look at this. as we head on into tomorrow we're looking at this risk of strong storms. can you see them firing up all the way from minneapolis and back down into texas. rainfall amounts, anywhere from 2 to 4 inches of rain, from oklahoma city all the way up to milwaukee. that's what's going on around s >> and that's your latest weather. savannah? >> thank you. barbra streisand is one of the world's most successful performers entertaining all around the globe and never in her hometown of brooklyn, until now. nbc's mara schiavocampo is live with more. mara, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. last night this place was packed with
thought many long, hard court battles throughout the civil rights era to make sure these groups would not have to disclose their donors to people. so melanie is right that it's odd we are requiring disclosure of little amounts given to candidates, but not large amounts not given to candidates. i am open to adjustments on those. there can be a lot of changes made in offense, but i think there is a fundamental difference there. there has not been a retreat for disclosure. we have never had before in our countries history, tracking people's political activity. he might jump in there. one of the thing that comes to mind is the game has changed, so has the ability to turn around disclosure itemization quickly. that's one of the things that's happening. >> iowa to talk about the irs. i like talking about boring subjects attempt to beat me down like a path that could never get out of. it is supposed to regulate social welfare nonprofits. social welfare nonprofits, 501-c4 groups come in the whole idea of dark money, their primary purpose is supposed to be social welfare, right? they're suppos
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 137 (some duplicates have been removed)